Shining a Light for Depression: An Invitation to Plant Hope

Penny_Tate_Pinning_Rick_Springfield

Many of us recognize the unfortunate stigma that remains in society when it comes to openly discussing our own or our loved ones depression and/or mental health.  Yet, as Paolo del Vecchio, M.S.W and Director of Mental Health at SAMHSA shares on his recent blog, less than 1/3 of those with mental health challenges receive treatment.  This must change.

Many of the images we are bombarded with in the media depict colorless and isolating scenes of those with depression, full of silent expressions of shame, hopelessness, and grief.  While this may be a key symptom of someone in the middle of a major depressive episode, the fact remains that depression is treatable and many find this experience their greatest gift.  All that is needed is for them to make it through the pain and find their way to light.

iFredBlogLogoToday on this Mental Health Blog Day, I would like to share my journey out of isolation.  It all started with planting a sunflower.

In 2009, I lost my mom to suicide.  She fell into a clinical depression in 2008 after undergoing some medication changes.  She suffered silently and lived in great fear of anyone finding out.  My dad and I knew of her struggle and did our best with the information we had at the time to help her.  But we also lived in isolation.

She begged for us not to ever share her suffering.  She saw herself as damaged goods and less than others.  As family members, we honored her request for privacy.  We only spoke to her doctors.  No one else in our family knew of her struggle.  She hid it from her siblings, extended family, and dear friends; the people who truly loved and cared for her happiness and well-being.  The stigma of depression had robbed our family of much needed guidance and support.

In my time of healing, I came across iFred’s message to “Shine a Light on Depression”.  When researching the topic, this was something I had never seen.  Seeing the beautiful sunflowers accompanied by the inspirational message that there is hope was very welcoming.  All around the world, sunflowers were being planted to honor the World Health Organization’s most recent statistic of the 350 million who experience depression.  I read about their Field for Hope project and knew I wanted to be a part of it.  I initially donated one dollar to have a sunflower planted in my mom’s honor, and it spiraled from there.

Next, I decided to plant my own garden which inspired Gardens for Hope. The sight of the sunflowers outside my window I knew would help cheer me.  I printed a sign from the website and posted it in my yard that I was “Shining a Light of Hope on Depression.”  What happened next came as a wonderful surprise.  Conversations were started in regards to my sunflower planting with my family and friends…and then neighbors.  People wanted to know about the project and its message.  Having the opportunity to open up the subject in such a positive way connected me to others in a way I never thought possible.  I was amazed at the response I received.  It truly opened the door for sharing experiences.

Penny_Gardens_For_Hope

From my backyard, I saw my own pathway to continue the conversation.  A farm located behind my home grows sunflowers in their field each season.  So I decided to approach the farmer and ask if they would be interested in donating their sunflowers to the cause by displaying a Field for Hope sign.  She immediately agreed and had her own stories to share.  With every visitor to her local farm stand, another community member was reached.

Once the conversations got started, I found it easier to share.  After posting on Facebook and Twitter, I received hundreds of messages.  People thanked me for talking about it.  Many then shared their stories with me.  I began to see that by shining my light on depression, it encouraged others to shine theirs.  I believe as we continue to have the conversation, we will indeed reduce the stigma by creating awareness and knowledge…and that all of us are most definitely not alone.

iFred saw the work I was doing, and asked me to come on their team to help #teachhope to kids dealing with depression and talk to celebrities like Rick Springfield to help end stigma with #famousfaces.  When I learned that research suggests HOPE is teachable, I got on board.  So we are now creating a curriculum that is being tested in schools across the country called Schools for Hope.

For me, it started with planting a sunflower and sharing my story.  Now I am no longer isolated.  My fear has dissipated.  I talk about depression.  I talk about available treatment.  I am the voice for my mom.  I am proud to talk about the wonderful human being she was and I do not define her life by her death.  She was an amazing mother, wife, sister, friend, and the list goes on.  And she had depression.  She lost her life to an illness that we are afraid to talk about.  This needs to change.

Never underestimate the power of your own voice and your own story.  Someone will be listening.  Just begin the conversation and plant your seed.  Shine Your Light for Hope.

A new article written by Penny Tate

#mhblogday #planthope #shinelight #endstigma #teachhope

 

 

Schools for Hope; New Campaign to Prevent Suicide in Youth

High School Teens at Oak Park River Forest High School Planting Hope, 2013

Did you know 1 in 9 kids attempt suicide prior to graduating high school, and that 40% of those kids are in grade school?  (Journal of Adolescent Health via Family Matters, 2011).  And that the number one autofill on google is ‘Hope makes me…  depressed’?  We don’t know exactly why, but what we do know is that the primary predictors of suicide include hopelessness and depression.  (Association of Physicians, 2004).

The Good news?  HOPE is teachable and depression is treatable? (Rand and Cheavens, 2008),  It is true.  Research suggests that Hope can be taught  and that the greater the hope, the greater the level of well-being (Scioli, 2009).  Hope is defined as the perceived ability to create pathways to a desired result, and the motivation to follow those pathways through to the desired result (Rand and Cheavens, 2008).  Higher Hope corresponds to greater emotional and psychological well-being, greater academic performance, and enhanced personal relationships (Snyder, 2005).

With your help, we can bring a lesson plan of HOPE with activities to the classroom.  Our goal is to raise $85,000 throughout December for this project through our Indiegogo campaign, and then to spend January and February creating the research-based curriculum to launch in ten test schools in April of 2014.  Our goal is then to take the finalized curriculum global in 2015.

Our Overall Vision for Schools for Hope:

Our aim is to expand on our Field for Hope project that cultivates Hope through seeing through a planting of sunflowers; from seed to flower and back to seed.  With your help we aim to take this project further and share messages and symbols of hope with others; creating curriculum around the planting specifically to teach Hope to children.  And then to nurture Hope and through peer to peer support to teach this to the next classroom.

  • Engaging children through a 360° support and wisdom sharing system—peer-to-peer, teachers, counselors/psychologists and parents.
  • Partnering with mental health education experts, curriculum will be targeted, self-paced and ready to implement into school systems.
  • Leverage online and new social mobile application technology to implement the program. Content will be engaging and inspirational and delivered on a relevant youth-oriented platform.
  • Integrate a yearly sunflower planting symbolic of HOPE in the Spring, writing messages of Hope to those that then harvest the seeds in the fall, starting the infinite spiral for Hope.
  • Garner research through metrics analysis, evaluation and optimization.
  • Pilot in Chicago schools; adapt to deploy tailored program focused in PTSD and tragedy to those areas as needed. (i.e. Sandy Hook, Columbine, Oklahoma, etc.)

Please help us make this campaign a success!  With your generous donation of time, brain power, and/or contacts we can get this moving.  Hope is teachable, depression is treatable. Let’s help make ALL kids feel value and like there is always a way to resolve problems in a positive, productive way.

Please visit www.schoolsforhope.org and help us make this project a reality.

In this light, I bring you Field for Hope

Kathryn Goetzke, iFred founder

When someone suffers from depression the effects ripple out to those they love.

I can still remember the moment. As I was getting ready for an upcoming weekend visit to see my dad, I called to see how he was doing. I knew something was terribly wrong when I heard a voice that wasn’t his. My mother took the receiver and told me the news that would forever change my life. My dad had taken his life.

My father was a successful businessman, but his pain was no mystery to me. He had resisted treatment because he did not want to admit to weakness in character. I cannot accurately describe in words the deep sense of abandonment, betrayal and total loss of self I felt when he died. I believe that, had he sought help earlier, he might well still be alive today.

Just weeks before he died he sent me a Valentine’s Day card telling me how much he loved me.  How he hoped I would never have to deal with the pain, deep regret and unhappiness he felt all the time. I carry the card with me as a reminder of his pain. It serves as my fuel to change the world for the better as a way to honor his life.

Depression is treatable, yet less than 25% of those with depression are getting treatment in part because of the stigma associated with the disease. This misunderstanding about depression is what prevented my father from getting treatment. As a branding expert, I know that by doing the following we can and will end the stigma of depression.

1. Use a universal symbol, the sunflower, around the world showcasing just how many are working for positive progress.

2. Engage celebrities, politicians, business leaders and activists to talk about their own depression

3.  Bring awareness of the biology of depression, and how our neurotransmitters, hormones, and brain chemistry are affected by everything we put in our body.

4. Focus on hope for those suffering from depression, instead of the negative depictions of depressed people that are often present in the media.

It is in this light I bring you Field for Hope. This global campaign asks people to come together and Pledge to Plant a sunflower to show honor and respect for the 350 million people around the world who live with depression. They need our help.

My dad had it all and did not deserve or need to die.  Do not let one more life be wasted. Pledge to Plant. Join our movement today at Causes.com/FieldforHope or visit www.ifred.org to find out how you can get help for yourself or someone you love.